18
Aug
09

The First Taste Of Seduction!!

sophisticated art, the ultimate form of power and persuasion. They learned
to work on the mind first, stimulating fantasies, keeping a man wanting
more, creating patterns of hope and despair—the essence of seduction.
Their power was not physical but psychological, not forceful but indirect
and cunning. These first great seductresses were like military generals plan¬
ning the destruction of an enemy, and indeed early accounts of seduction
often compare it to battle, the feminine version of warfare. For Cleopatra,
it was a means of consolidating an empire. In seduction, the woman was no
longer a passive sex object; she had become an active agent, a figure of
power.
With a few exceptions—the Latin poet Ovid, the medieval
troubadours—men did not much concern themselves with such a frivolous
art as seduction. Then, in the seventeenth century came a great change:
men grew interested in seduction as a way to overcome a young woman’s
resistance to sex. History’s first great male seducers—the Duke de Lauzun,
the different Spaniards who inspired the Don Juan legend—began to adopt
the methods traditionally employed by women. They learned to dazzle
with their appearance (often androgynous in nature), to stimulate the
imagination, to play the coquette. They also added a new, masculine ele¬
ment to the game: seductive language, for they had discovered a woman’s
weakness for soft words. These two forms of seduction—the feminine use
of appearances and the masculine use of language—would often cross
gender lines: Casanova would dazzle a woman with his clothes; Ninon
de l’Enclos would charm a man with her words.
At the same time that men were developing their version of seduction,
others began to adapt the art for social purposes. As Europe’s feudal system
of government faded into the past, courtiers needed to get their way in
court without the use of force. They learned the power to be gained by se¬
ducing their superiors and competitors through psychological games, soft
words, a little coquetry. As culture became democratized, actors, dandies,
and artists came to use the tactics of seduction as a way to charm and win
over their audience and social milieu. In the nineteenth century another
great change occurred: politicians like Napoleon consciously saw them¬
selves as seducers, on a grand scale. These men depended on the art of se¬
ductive oratory, but they also mastered what had once been feminine
strategies: staging vast spectacles, using theatrical devices, creating a charged
physical presence. All this, they learned, was the essence of charisma—and
remains so today. By seducing the masses they could accumulate immense
power without the use of force.

And So It Starts

Thousands of years ago, power was mostly gained through physical violence and maintained with brute strength. There was little need for

subtlety—a king or emperor had to be merciless. Only a select few had

power, but no one suffered under this scheme of things more than women.

They had no way to compete, no weapon at their disposal that could make

a man do what they wanted—politically, socially, or even in the home.

Of course men had one weakness: their insatiable desire for sex. A

woman could always toy with this desire, but once she gave in to sex the

man was back in control; and if she withheld sex, he could simply look

elsewhere—or exert force. What good was a power that was so temporary

and frail? Yet women had no choice but to submit to this condition. There

were some, though, whose hunger for power was too great, and who, over

the years, through much cleverness and creativity, invented a way of turning the dynamic around, creating a more lasting and effective form of

power.

These women—among them Bathsheba, from the Old Testament;

Helen of Troy; the Chinese siren Hsi Shi; and the greatest of them all,

Cleopatra—invented seduction. First they would draw a man in with an alluring appearance, designing their makeup and adornment to fashion the

image of a goddess come to life. By showing only glimpses of flesh, they

would tease a man’s imagination, stimulating the desire not just for sex but

for something greater: the chance to possess a fantasy figure. Once they had

their victims’ interest, these women would lure them away from the masculine world of war and politics and get them to spend time in the feminine

world—a world of luxury, spectacle, and pleasure. They might also lead

them astray literally, taking them on a journey, as Cleopatra lured Julius

Caesar on a trip down the Nile. Men would grow hooked on these refined,

sensual pleasures—they would fall in love. But then, invariably, the women

would turn cold and indifferent, confusing their victims. Just when the

men wanted more, they found their pleasures withdrawn. They would be

forced into pursuit, trying anything to win back the favors they once had

tasted and growing weak and emotional in the process. Men who had

physical force and all the social power—men like King David, the Trojan

Paris, Julius Caesar, Mark Antony, King Fu Chai—would find themselves

becoming the slave of a woman.

In the face of violence and brutality, these women made seduction a sophisticated art, the ultimate form of power and persuasion. They learned

to work on the mind first, stimulating fantasies, keeping a man wanting

more, creating patterns of hope and despair—the essence of seduction.

Their power was not physical but psychological, not forceful but indirect

and cunning. These first great seductresses were like military generals plan¬

ning the destruction of an enemy, and indeed early accounts of seduction

often compare it to battle, the feminine version of warfare. For Cleopatra,

it was a means of consolidating an empire. In seduction, the woman was no

longer a passive sex object; she had become an active agent, a figure of

power.

With a few exceptions—the Latin poet Ovid, the medieval

troubadours—men did not much concern themselves with such a frivolous

art as seduction. Then, in the seventeenth century came a great change:

men grew interested in seduction as a way to overcome a young woman’s

resistance to sex. History’s first great male seducers—the Duke de Lauzun,

the different Spaniards who inspired the Don Juan legend—began to adopt

the methods traditionally employed by women. They learned to dazzle

with their appearance (often androgynous in nature), to stimulate the

imagination, to play the coquette. They also added a new, masculine ele¬

ment to the game: seductive language, for they had discovered a woman’s

weakness for soft words. These two forms of seduction—the feminine use

of appearances and the masculine use of language—would often cross

gender lines: Casanova would dazzle a woman with his clothes; Ninon

de l’Enclos would charm a man with her words.

At the same time that men were developing their version of seduction,

others began to adapt the art for social purposes. As Europe’s feudal system

of government faded into the past, courtiers needed to get their way in

court without the use of force. They learned the power to be gained by se¬

ducing their superiors and competitors through psychological games, soft

words, a little coquetry. As culture became democratized, actors, dandies,

and artists came to use the tactics of seduction as a way to charm and win

over their audience and social milieu. In the nineteenth century another

great change occurred: politicians like Napoleon consciously saw them¬

selves as seducers, on a grand scale. These men depended on the art of se¬

ductive oratory, but they also mastered what had once been feminine

strategies: staging vast spectacles, using theatrical devices, creating a charged

physical presence. All this, they learned, was the essence of charisma—and

remains so today. By seducing the masses they could accumulate immense

power without the use of force.

Stay Close And Find Out More…….

Captivate

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: